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This talk proposes a connection between the findings from the cross-linguistic research on restructuring, in particular the diversity of domain transparency for operations such as clitic climbing and scrambling, and various puzzles related to the domain of quantifier raising (QR). Based on the distribution of restructuring in a wide range of languages, I first present new evidence for a Grohmann’sche organization of clauses into three domains.

The Landscape of Nonlocal Readings of Adjectives

It is an interesting curiosity that _occasional_ can get an adverb-like reading in which it seems to scope outside its DP (Bolinger 1967, Stump 1981, Larson 1999, Zimmermann 2003, Schäfer 2007, DeVries 2010, Gehrke & McNally 2010):

Searching for survivors: gleaning insight into semantic processing from instances of misinterpretation

Distinguished psycholinguist Elissa Newport – Professor at the Georgetown University Medical Center, Director of its Center for Brain Plasticity and Recovery, and Principal Investigator within theLearning and Development Lab – will be giving a series of three lectures, generously supported by Dave Baggett.

Distinguished psycholinguist Elissa Newport – Professor at the Georgetown University Medical Center, Director of its Center for Brain Plasticity and Recovery, and Principal Investigator within theLearning and Development Lab – will be giving a series of three lectures, generously supported by Dave Baggett.

Elissa Newport

Distinguished psycholinguist Elissa Newport – Professor at the Georgetown University Medical Center, Director of its Center for Brain Plasticity and Recovery, and Principal Investigator within the Learning and Development Lab – will be giving a series of three lectures, generously supported by Dave Baggett.

Zoe Schlueter will talk about her current research using EEG methods to understand predictive processes at the semantic/discourse level.

Anne Christophe

Children who are in the process of acquiring their mother tongue have to learn its words, its phonology, and its syntax. For each of these domains, knowledge in other domains would help. For instance, since syntactic structure spells out the relationships between words in a sentence, it is reasonable to assume that children need to have access to words and their meanings in order to learn about syntax. On the other hand, learning word meanings would be greatly facilitated if children had access to some aspects of syntactic structure (Gleitman, 1990).

At this week’s lab meeting, we’ll be hearing from Dustin Chacón, who will be talking about “Resumptives: the pronouns that we maybe now understand them”. He’ll talk about background on parsing long distance dependencies and on the murky status of resumptive pronouns, and then he’ll summarize some experiments that he has recently carried out, plus new experiments that are in the planning stages.

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