Language Science Courses

Linguistics and Language Diversity:

  • LING611 Issues in Syntax; (3 credits)
    Descripton: Topics of current theoretical interest examined through data from a variety of languages. 
  • LING621 Issues in Phonology; (3 credits)
    Description: Topics of current interest in phonological theory examined through data from several languages.
     
  • LING661 Issues in Semantics; (3 credits)
    Description: A second course in semantic theory. Application of basic concepts and methods to topics of current theoretical interest. 

Ethics:

  • NACS600: (PermReq) Ethics in Scientific Research; (2 credits)
    Description: Issues of scientific integrity with emphasis on investigators in the laboratory sciences, including mentoring, scientific record keeping, authorship and peer review, ownership of data, use of animals and humans in research, and conflict of interest.

Advanced Seminars:

  • LING879 Seminar in Semantics: [Varying topics] (3 credits)

Cognition and Neuroscience: 

  • HESP602 (PermReq) Neurological Bases of Human Communication; (3 credits) Description: Basic neurology as it pertains to anatomical and physiological substrates of speech and language.
     
  • HESP610 Aphasia; (3 credits) Description: Language problems of adults associated with brain injury.
     
  • HESP724 Research Design; (3 credits) Description: Evaluations of research designs, critique of published articles and student involvement in designing experiments on assigned topics.
     
  • LING641 Issues in Psycholinguistics; (3 credits) Description: Topics of current interest in psycholinguistics, including both theoretical approaches and experimental and analytical issues in language acquisition, language processing, and neurolinguistics. ​

Courses eligible for the NACS certificate:

  • NACS608 Neuroscience and Cognitive Science Seminar; (1 credit)
     
  • NACS642 Cognitive Neuroscience; (4 credits) Description: A study of the fundamental concepts and techniques of cognitive neuroscience. Hands-on experience with three critically different cognitive neuroscience methods: EEG, MEG, and fMRI.
     
  • NACS643 Computational Neuroscience; (4 credits) Description: Provides a mathematical foundation in computational neuroscience.

Computational/Neural Modeling:

  • CMSC773 Computational Linguistics II; (3 credits) Description: Natural language processing with a focus on corpus-based statistical techniques. Topics inlcude: stochastic language modeling, smoothing, noisy channel models, probabilistic grammars and parsing; lexical acquisition, similarity-based methods, word sense disambiguation, statistical methods in NLP applications; system evaluation.

Other course(s) students found useful:

  • PSYC602 Quantitative methods II; (4 credits) K. O’Grady Description: A continuation of PSYC 601. Topics include experimental design, analysi of variance, analysis of covariance, multiple regression, and general linear models.
     
  • LING644 Language Acquisition; (3 credits) J. Lidz Description: Interpretations of observational and experimental work on children's language development, and relationship between developmental stages and theories of human language faculties.
     
  • LING689T Independent Study; Pedagogy for Linguistics; (1 credit) T. Bleam Description: Designed for novice instructors to collaboratively explore and evaluate methodologies that support teaching improvement and learner achievement.
     
  • LING698 Directed Study; Seminar; (1-3 credits) H. Lasnik
     
  • LING698C Directed Study; Computational Psycholinguistics; (3 credits) N. Feldman Descripton: Explores how ideas from statistics and machine learning can be used to model the acquisition, processing, and evolution of language. The focus will be on three popular computational approaches: symbolic systems, neural networks, and probabilistic models.
     
  • LING773 Computational Linguistics II; (3 credits) P. Resnik Description: Natural language processing with a focus on corpus-based statistical techniques. Topics include: stochastic language modeling, smoothing, noisy channel models, probabilistic grammars and parsing; lexical acquisition, similarity-based methods, word sense disambiguation, statistical methods in NLP applications; system evaluation.
     
  • LING819C Seminar in Syntactic Theory; Ellipsis; (3 credits) H. Lasnik
     
  • LING889C Directed Research; Computational Psycholinguistics (3 credits) N. Feldman Description: Explores how ideas from statistics and machine learning can be used to model the acquisition, processing, and evolution of language. The focus will be on three popular computational approaches: symbolic systems, neural networks, and probabilistic models.
     
  • SLAA620 Second Language Research Methodologies; (3 credits) S. Ross Description: An exploration of research methodology in second language acquisition (SLA), with a focus on developing practical skills in data analysis and interpretation. Preparation in both critical evaluation of existing research and design of new research models.
     
  • SLAA640 Psycholinguistics; (3 credits) N. Jiang Description: An introduction to the field of psycholinguistics that covers speech perception, word recognition, sentence and discourse processing, speech production, and language acquisition. Basic concepts, research methods, major research topics, leading theories and related research findings, with implications of psycholinguistic theories and findings for second language studies.
     
  • SLAA749I Special Topics in Second Language Learning; Individual Differences (3 credits) R. De Keyser
     
  • SLAA754 Task-Based Language Teaching; (3 credits) M. Long Description: Overview of Task-Based Language Teaching (TBLT) including needs and means analysis, syllabus design, materials writing, methodology and pedagogy, testing, and evaluation. Theoretical issues addressed include relationship of TBLT to research findings on the psychology of learning and SLA and libertarian approaches to education.
     
  • SLAA888R Doctoral Independent Study; Research Critique; (3 credits) N. Jiang