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Language Science Lunch Talks

 

Julianne Garbarino (HESP): How do disfluencies relate to early grammatical errors?

Abstract: Children usually begin to stutter between ages 2.5 and 3.5-- a period when their expressive language includes many errors when compared to adult models. This talk will explore the relationship between grammatical errors in children's early language and the production of stuttering-like and non-stuttered disfluencies.

 

 

Syntactic vs. lexical effects in fMRI and MEG

 

Neural Mechanisms underlying Segregation in the Ferret Cocktail Party

 

Non-actional passives can be comprehended by 4-year olds

(Rescheduled from April 16.)

Online: https://umd.zoom.us/j/95049491821
Meeting ID: 950 4949 1821

Engaging cognitive control helps children ignore unreliable sentence processing cues

Join Zoom Meeting here: https://umd.zoom.us/j/817699157
Meeting ID: 817 699 157
 

African American English and early literacy: A comparison of approaches to quantifying nonmainstream dialect use

 

Do children know WHanything? Acquisition of Mandarin wh-indefinites

Abstract: Unlike English wh-words like “what”, Mandarin wh-words have both an interrogative and an indefinite interpretation, as shown in (1). 

(1)   Xiaoxiao mei chi shenme.
       Xiaoxiao NEG eat what

a.     Interrogative: What didn’t Xiaoxiao eat?
b.     Indefinite: Xiaoxiao didn’t eat anything/much. 

This talk will be online only. You can join via Zoom at this link: https://umd.zoom.us/j/969408848

You can also join by phone (dispreferred): 
     +1 301 715 8592
     Meeting ID: 969 408 848
     Find your local number: https://umd.zoom.us/u/ajUnnq3BA
 

Research in language science can be limited by convenience

Lunch served at 12:15, talk starts at 12:30. This week boxed lunches will be available for the first 40 attendees, so come on time or bring your own lunch!

Remote attendance through Zoom: https://umd.zoom.us/j/737125765
(Please remember to set this up in advance: you'll be prompted to install an app to join the meeting.)

Adam Fisbein (NACS)

Sequence in birdsong: What humans assume and what birds are telling us

Lunch served at 12:15, talk starts at 12:30.

Erika Exton: The 'bilingual baby problem': Identifying code switches in unfamiliar languages

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