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Abstract: Studies of language input and language development in monolingual and bilingual populations reveal how children use input to learn language, and thus they reveal what children need from input in order to learn language. Findings have implications for understanding individual and between-group differences in children’s language skill and for designing interventions and policy aimed at closing language gaps.

Erika Hoff is a professor of Psychology at Florida Atlantic University.

Abstract: A number of researchers have proposed that children gradually acquire abstract phonological categories such as phonemes as vocabulary size increases. This claim is of particular interest because phonemic awareness and vocabulary size are the two best predictors of literacy success.

Abstract: Infant vocal development reveals foundations for language, starting from the first month of life, and even before full-term birth in infants 2-months premature. These non-cry, spontaneously produced “protophones” are explored and elaborated in vocal play and face-to-face interaction, yielding rich interchanges for which there is no known precedent in non-humans.

Probabilistic models of human cognition have been widely successful at capturing the ways that people represent and reason with uncertain knowledge. In this talk I will explore the ways that this probabilistic approach can be applied to systematic and productive reasoning – in particular, natural language pragmatics and semantics. I will first describe how probabilistic programming languages provide a formal tool encompassing probabilistic uncertainty and compositional structure. I'll illustrate with a examples from inductive reasoning and social cognition.

Angela Xiaoxue He will present her dissertation defense on "Verb Learning Under Guidance: Syntax-to-Semantics Inferences."

 

In celebration of Autism Awareness month, UMARC will be showing The Story of Luke in the Hoff Theater at STAMP Student Union. After the movie there will be a panel discussion with Dr. Kathy Matthews, the executive director of the Faison School in Richmond, Virginia and a representative from the Treatment and Learning Centers Outcome Program in Rockville, Maryland. 

 

Lecture given by Dr. Andrew Egel from the Department of Special Education at the University of Maryland, College Park.

Lecture given by Dr. Elizabeth Redcay from the Psychology Department at the University of Maryland, College Park. 

For more information, see the flier here

Food and ideas bring people together.  Our weekly lunch talk series provides students and faculty with the opportunity to present their in-progress work to a supportive, interdisciplinary audience.

Food and ideas bring people together.  Our weekly lunch talk series provides students and faculty with the opportunity to present their in-progress work to a supportive, interdisciplinary audience.

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